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National Fire Prevention Week 2021

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Micah Butler, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, pours water over a pot with hot grease during a kitchen fire demonstration at Bethel Manor Housing, Yorktown, Va., Oct. 6, 2017.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Micah Butler, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, pours water over a pot with hot grease during a kitchen fire demonstration at Bethel Manor Housing, Yorktown, Va., Oct. 6, 2017. According to the Fire Department, the proper way to put out a grease fire is to turn off the stove and put a lid on the pot because pouring water over it will cause an adverse reaction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anthony Nin Leclerec)

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. --

National Fire Prevention Week 2021 is observed Oct. 3 to Oct. 9 to emphasize the importance of fire safety in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.  The incident claimed over 250 lives, left 100,000 people homeless, destroyed 17,000 structures, and burned over 2,000 acres of land. Remembering this event can shed light on and educate communities on the importance of fire and life safety education. 

The importance of fire prevention is will be emphasized throughout the week. In a fire, mere seconds can mean the difference between safe escape and tragedy.

This year’s theme is Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety. The agenda focuses on every family member’s ability to distinguish the sounds that a smoke alarm makes, what each sound means, and how to respond to that sound. 

The following tips can help people determine what various smoke detector sounds mean:

  • Chirping or beeping – typically caused by a low battery (change every six months)
    • Full buzzer or beeping – caused by smoke, change in temperature, or humidity (exit your home or facility, have a plan before this occurs)
  • Voice alarm – new alarms that add voice commands for effectiveness
  • Carbon monoxide alarm – may beep or use voice commands for effectiveness

For the deaf or hard of hearing, there are specially made smoke alarms and alert devices that include strobe lights. There are also pillows and bed shakers that are designed to work with your smoke alarm.

Make sure all smoke and CO alarms meet the needs of your family members, including those with sensory or physical disabilities, and are listed by a qualified testing laboratory.

Due to COVID-19 constraints, the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Fire Emergency Services will conduct the following events to further the message for base members:

Ft. Eustis events:

  • Oct. 5 – Static Display at the Base Commissary 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Oct. 7 – Static Display at the Base Exchange 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Oct. 13 - Pumpkin Patch Fire Safety Event (Bldg. 126, Balfour Beatty Communities – 3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Langley Air Force Base events:

  • Oct. 5 – Static Display at the Base Commissary 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Oct. 7 – Static Display at the Base Exchange 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Langley AFB firefighters will hand out Fire Safety bags at the Base Exchange, Child Development Center and Youth Centers throughout the week.

Contact the Fort Eustis Fire and Emergency Services at 757-878-4281, ext 327, 323, or 321, or the Langley Air Force Base Fire Department for additional information 757-764-4222 or 633ces.cef.firepreve@us.af.mil.

To learn more about “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety,” visit NFPA’s website at www.firepreventionweek.org.